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Silence to be held for Tunisia victims

A minute's silence will be observed across the North West at midday as the country comes to a standstill one week on from the Tunisian terror attack which killed 30 British tourists.

Flags will be flown at half-mast over Buckingham Palace and government buildings, as an RAF operation to repatriate their bodies continues.

The Queen will be joining people across the country in the act of remembrance, and will mark the silence during a visit to the University of Strathclyde in Glasgow.

Meanwhile, David Cameron will observe the silence at his constituency in Oxfordshire.

At Wimbledon, the start of the day's play will be delayed until 12.15pm – giving tennis players, fans and officials an opportunity to pay their respects.

So far, 17 victims have been flown back to the UK – and the first inquests into their deaths are expected to open at West London Coroner's Court later today.

Yesterday, a C-17 military transport aircraft bearing the bodies of Lisa and William Graham, Philip Heathcote, Trudy Jones, Ann and James McQuire, Janet and John Stocker, and David Thompson arrived at RAF Brize Norton.

Scores of family liaison officers are supporting the families of those killed, as well as the relatives of holidaymakers who survived Seifeddine Rezgui's attack on a Sousse resort.

In total, 38 holidaymakers died – including three Irish nationals, two Germans, one Belgian, one Russian and one Portuguese.

Holiday operators Thomson and First Choice have confirmed that all 30 of the British victims were their customers.

Kamel Jendoubi, a Tunisian minister, has said an investigation has allowed the government "to discover the network behind the operation in Sousse". Islamic State has claimed responsibility for the attack.

Officials believe Rezgui, who was shot dead by police, had accomplices who helped him commit the atrocity – and eight people suspected of having direct links to the gunman are in custody.

British Defence Secretary Michael Fallon has vowed that those responsible for the attack will be "tracked down".

He said: "Let the House be in absolutely no doubt, the people who perpetrated the murders of our constituents are going to be tracked down, whether they are in Libya, in Syria or anywhere else."

The Metropolitan Police said hundreds of counter terrorism officers are helping the international response to the attack.

Specialist advisers have been sent to Tunisia to help the Foreign Office and Tunisian authorities in reviewing security at other resorts and attractions.

Assistant Commissioner Mark Rowley, the national policing lead for counter terrorism, has appealed for witnesses to get in touch with police.

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